Serra Fact Sheet


(a)  To foster and promote vocations to the ministerial priesthood of the Catholic Church as a particular vocation to service and to develop appreciation of the ministerial priesthood and of all religious vocations in the Catholic Church

(b)  To further Catholicism by encouraging its members in fellowship through education to fulfill their Christian vocations to service


Membership There are more than 700 Serra clubs in 36 countries with a total membership of more than 23,000 lay women and men.  Membership in the local Serra clubs is restricted to Catholic lay women and men, and to those who have been ordained to the permanent diaconate.

Organization: The basic unit of Serra International is the local club.  Clubs are organized into Districts and the Districts are organized into national councils were Appropriate.  Presently there are nine national councils (in order of formation):

Great Britain            Brazil                          Spain

Italy                            Mexico                      Philippines

USA                            Australia                   Canada

In the United States the Districts are organized into 13 Regions that are identical to the regions established by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops. (NCCB)

Serra International has a Board of Trustees that are proportional to the number of Serrans throughout the world.

Meetings and Conferences Serra clubs generally meet two times a month.  Regional or ?District conferences are held in the Fall of each year.  In the Spring, a Spring Leadership Planning Conferences (SLPC) ARE HELD IN EACH District to train the new club officers and to assist in the planning by each club in the District.  An International Convention is held each year in late June or early July and is attended by membership from throughout the world.

Historical Information: Four Catholic lay persons formed the first Serra club in 1935 in Seattle, Washington.  The founding Serrans chose as their organization’s patron Blessed Junipera Serra, the 18th century Franciscan missionary to Mexico and California.  Serra is aggregated to the Vatican’s Sacred Council for Catholic Education  and the Pontifical Work for Priestly Vocations.  In 1986, Serra International voted to welcome women as well as men to membership in the organization.